Allepuz

Waves of liberal armies
and Carlists

Waves of liberal and Carlist armies

Allepuz could be the prototype of a small peripheral town involved in an increasingly demanding war dynamic. Located at a transition point between the Maestrazgo and the Alfambra valley, this locality did not occupy a strategic enclave. Despite this, its inhabitants lived the echoes of important military events, such as the Royal Expedition in 1837, the siege of Morella in 1838 or the final assault of the liberal army on the capitals of Maestrazgo in 1840.

© José Luis Cano

The information

The Royal Expedition

Road to Madrid

Guerrillas from other wars

Information on the presence of columns or parties was key to the development of the war.

In the spring of 1837 a large military expedition of 14,000 men left Navarre, leading the Carlist pretender himself.

The prince Don Carlos finally arrived, after a journey through the lands of Castellón, to the “magical kingdom of Cabrera” of which Baron Rahden spoke.

The First Carlist War (1833-1840) was one more in the sequence of counterrevolutionary wars that Spaniards had lived through since the Convention War (1793-1795)…

The liberal authorities demanded that the town councils notify “the direction or situation of the factions, whether they are gathered or dispersed, specifying their number and commanding chief, whether they are infantry or cavalry, what kind of weapons they carry and other details” that would allow them to correctly direct the operations. The Carlists threatened the worst punishments to those who complied with these orders. In spite of the risks, in 1838, neighbors of Allepuz arrived in liberal territory with recent news about the failure of the military operation over Cantavieja and Morella.

His intention was to tour the territories where Don Carlos had the most support, before launching a decisive blow on Madrid. From the moment Cabrera learned of his departure, he made an effort to gather in the warehouses of Maestrazgo all the supplies and resources necessary to supply the troops during their time in Teruel. On June 23 he was in Allepuz with the Tortosa battalions and a cavalry squadron when Captain Gamundi arrived with the news he was waiting for: the Royal Expedition was going to cross the Ebro. On the 29th it should be positioned on the right bank and have the boats ready so that the Carlist troops could cross the river.

The court was established in La Iglesuela on July 22, but such a large contingent of troops forced the Carlists to distribute their men throughout the territory and provide accommodation in various localities in the area. Due to its proximity to the main points of the Carlist Maestrazgo, Allepuz was one of the towns that offered hospitality to the expeditionary troops. Three weeks later, not far from here, the enormous rebel contingent would pass, with hesitant steps, on its way to Madrid.

…and which had one of its most important milestones in the War of Independence (1808-1814). Some guerrillas came to the Carlist war with a long combat experience in this field. One of these was the priest Merino, who had earned his prestige fighting against the French and against the constitutionalists of the Liberal Triennium. In the summer of 1838 he arrived in Teruel from Soria and at the beginning of July he passed through Allepuz on his way to Rubielos.

Civilians, often unwittingly, participated in the information war that accompanied the war.
Civilians, often unwittingly, participated in the information war that accompanied the war.
Located on the right bank of the river, Cabrera supervises the operations of the Royal Expedition's passage of the Ebro.
Located on the right bank of the river, Cabrera supervises the operations of the Royal Expedition's passage of the Ebro.
The Royal Expedition at the gates of Castellón in early July 1837.
The Royal Expedition at the gates of Castellón in early July 1837.
Jerónimo Merino (1769-1844) was a guerrilla priest famous for his participation in the War of Independence.
Jerónimo Merino (1769-1844) was a guerrilla priest famous for his participation in the War of Independence.

The information

Information on the presence of columns or parties was key to the development of the war.

The liberal authorities demanded that the town councils notify “the direction or situation of the factions, whether they are gathered or dispersed, specifying their number and commanding chief, whether they are infantry or cavalry, what kind of weapons they carry and other details” that would allow them to correctly direct the operations. The Carlists threatened the worst punishments to those who complied with these orders. In spite of the risks, in 1838, neighbors of Allepuz arrived in liberal territory with recent news about the failure of the military operation over Cantavieja and Morella.

Civilians, often unwittingly, participated in the information war that accompanied the war.
Civilians, often unwittingly, participated in the information war that accompanied the war.

The Royal Expedition

In the spring of 1837 a large military expedition of 14,000 men left Navarre, leading the Carlist pretender himself.

His intention was to tour the territories where Don Carlos had the most support, before launching a decisive blow on Madrid. From the moment Cabrera learned of his departure, he made an effort to gather in the warehouses of Maestrazgo all the supplies and resources necessary to supply the troops during their time in Teruel. On June 23 he was in Allepuz with the Tortosa battalions and a cavalry squadron when Captain Gamundi arrived with the news he was waiting for: the Royal Expedition was going to cross the Ebro. On the 29th it should be positioned on the right bank and have the boats ready so that the Carlist troops could cross the river.

Located on the right bank of the river, Cabrera supervises the operations of the Royal Expedition's passage of the Ebro.
Located on the right bank of the river, Cabrera supervises the operations of the Royal Expedition's passage of the Ebro.

Road to Madrid

The prince Don Carlos finally arrived, after a journey through the lands of Castellón, to the “magical kingdom of Cabrera” of which Baron Rahden spoke.

The court was established in La Iglesuela on July 22, but such a large contingent of troops forced the Carlists to distribute their men throughout the territory and provide accommodation in various localities in the area. Due to its proximity to the main points of the Carlist Maestrazgo, Allepuz was one of the towns that offered hospitality to the expeditionary troops. Three weeks later, not far from here, the enormous rebel contingent would pass, with hesitant steps, on its way to Madrid.

The Royal Expedition at the gates of Castellón in early July 1837.
The Royal Expedition at the gates of Castellón in early July 1837.

Guerrillas from other wars

The First Carlist War (1833-1840) was one more in the sequence of counterrevolutionary wars that Spaniards had lived through since the Convention War (1793-1795)…

…and which had one of its most important milestones in the War of Independence (1808-1814). Some guerrillas came to the Carlist war with a long combat experience in this field. One of these was the priest Merino, who had earned his prestige fighting against the French and against the constitutionalists of the Liberal Triennium. In the summer of 1838 he arrived in Teruel from Soria and at the beginning of July he passed through Allepuz on his way to Rubielos.

Jerónimo Merino (1769-1844) was a guerrilla priest famous for his participation in the War of Independence.
Jerónimo Merino (1769-1844) was a guerrilla priest famous for his participation in the War of Independence.