Bordon

Support point

Support point

Bordón was a Carlist support point sheltered from the main fortified enclaves of the rebel territory. At the beginning it served as a concentration point for Carlist orders demanded from the town councils of the area and a hospital was installed there for the recovery of the wounded of the rebel troops.
In its municipal district a liberal convoy was assaulted by Llagostera in February 1837 that was being driven by the Marquis of Palacio between Cantavieja and Calanda.

© José Luis Cano

Bordón's pardon

Columns and convoys

Assault on the liberal column

Luco de Bordón

At the beginning of May 1836, Ramón Cabrera was in Bordón. It was in his mind to take an important step and settle permanently in Cantavieja.

The war brought frenetic activity to Maestrazgo. Convoys were constantly going back and forth, carrying supplies, fodder, military equipment and all kinds of effects necessary for the war.

In February 1837, the Carlist leader Llagostera, known by his enemies as “La Langosta” (The Lobster), due to his voracity in collecting money, heard that a liberal column was descending from Cantavieja to Alcañiz and decided to intercept it.

In the autumn of 1839, the Maestrazgo began to feel the effects of the Vergara Agreement and the end of the Carlist war on the northern front. Espartero’s troops moved to Lower Aragon and began to harass the territory of Cabrera.

To show his control over the situation and over the territory he offered a pardon to all the Elizabethan soldiers and employees who presented themselves surrendering their armament and clothing. He gave the officers the opportunity to join the Carlist army and promised the fifth-year officers that half of the time they still had to serve as recruits would be deducted from their pay.

It was also traveled by groups of armed men. At the beginning, they were small parties led by a leader who guided the rebels from one town to another. Later, more organized units of the Carlist army. This was not an obstacle for the liberal columns to dispute the same terrain, sometimes reaching the heart of the rebel territory, such as General San Miguel in Cantavieja, or General Oráa in Fortanete.

He did it together with Bordón, as the report says, taking advantage of “the rugged terrain where he was walking”. Throwing himself on the enemy, he managed to disperse them until the combat was recomposed around the area of Peñacortada. According to the Carlists, the enemy had 11 dead and numerous wounded, in addition to losing three pieces of baggage with officers’ baggage and campaign effects, and only 5 wounded on their side.

In Bordón and Luco de Bordón, after a long time under Carlist control, the first liberal troops could be seen moving through the territory. The Carlists harassed them as much as they could to show that in their army “there were no Marotos, Urbiztondos and Cabañeros”, that is, supporters of peace. Attacked in the vicinity of Bordón, they forced the liberals to retreat to safer positions in the plains such as Aguaviva.

Families' workforces were depleted by the recruitment of men for the war.
Families' workforces were depleted by the recruitment of men for the war.
With the war, there was a continuous coming and going of soldiers and goods along the roads of Maestrazgo.
With the war, there was a continuous coming and going of soldiers and goods along the roads of Maestrazgo.
Luis Llagostera had fought during the Liberal Triennium under the orders of Baron d'Eroles.
Luis Llagostera had fought during the Liberal Triennium under the orders of Baron d'Eroles.
The peace sealed in the north with the Abrazo de Vergara in August 1839 brought the entire liberal army to Maestrazgo.
The peace sealed in the north with the Abrazo de Vergara in August 1839 brought the entire liberal army to Maestrazgo.

Bordón's pardon

At the beginning of May 1836, Ramón Cabrera was in Bordón. It was in his mind to take an important step and settle permanently in Cantavieja.

To show his control over the situation and over the territory he offered a pardon to all the Elizabethan soldiers and employees who presented themselves surrendering their armament and clothing. He gave the officers the opportunity to join the Carlist army and promised the fifth-year officers that half of the time they still had to serve as recruits would be deducted from their pay.

Families' workforces were depleted by the recruitment of men for the war.
Families' workforces were depleted by the recruitment of men for the war.

Columns and convoys

The war brought frenetic activity to Maestrazgo. Convoys were constantly going back and forth, carrying supplies, fodder, military equipment and all kinds of effects necessary for the war.

It was also traveled by groups of armed men. At the beginning, they were small parties led by a leader who guided the rebels from one town to another. Later, more organized units of the Carlist army. This was not an obstacle for the liberal columns to dispute the same terrain, sometimes reaching the heart of the rebel territory, such as General San Miguel in Cantavieja, or General Oráa in Fortanete.

With the war, there was a continuous coming and going of soldiers and goods along the roads of Maestrazgo.
With the war, there was a continuous coming and going of soldiers and goods along the roads of Maestrazgo.

Assault on the liberal column

In February 1837, the Carlist leader Llagostera, known by his enemies as “La Langosta” (The Lobster), due to his voracity in collecting money, heard that a liberal column was descending from Cantavieja to Alcañiz and decided to intercept it.

He did it together with Bordón, as the report says, taking advantage of “the rugged terrain where he was walking”. Throwing himself on the enemy, he managed to disperse them until the combat was recomposed around the area of Peñacortada. According to the Carlists, the enemy had 11 dead and numerous wounded, in addition to losing three pieces of baggage with officers’ baggage and campaign effects, and only 5 wounded on their side.

Luis Llagostera had fought during the Liberal Triennium under the orders of Baron d'Eroles.
Luis Llagostera had fought during the Liberal Triennium under the orders of Baron d'Eroles.

Luco de Bordón

In the autumn of 1839, the Maestrazgo began to feel the effects of the Vergara Agreement and the end of the Carlist war on the northern front. Espartero’s troops moved to Lower Aragon and began to harass the territory of Cabrera.

In Bordón and Luco de Bordón, after a long time under Carlist control, the first liberal troops could be seen moving through the territory. The Carlists harassed them as much as they could to show that in their army “there were no Marotos, Urbiztondos and Cabañeros”, that is, supporters of peace. Attacked in the vicinity of Bordón, they forced the liberals to retreat to safer positions in the plains such as Aguaviva.

The peace sealed in the north with the Abrazo de Vergara in August 1839 brought the entire liberal army to Maestrazgo.
The peace sealed in the north with the Abrazo de Vergara in August 1839 brought the entire liberal army to Maestrazgo.